God’s Word, God’s People, a Pastor’s Joy


Tomorrow is the 1st of July. 10 months ago our church began studying the book of Galatians and this week we close the book.

We have a tradition at Crystal Park Baptist Church that on the Sunday an epistle is completed we read the book, from verse 1 through to the final verse with a short homily delivered at the natural breaks.

The idea is that over 10 months we unpacked the author’s original intent to his original audience – having considered in detail culture, language, geography, grammar, history, politics and many other nuances – so now we get to hear the book read, as it was intended to be consumed.

It’s a really exciting event for me. I love God, love His Word and love His People and when those three things come together in worship, fellowship and teaching He is exulted and glorified.

The three images below is the book outline which I’ve used to co-ordinate the preaching schedule and which I will use to drive the main points of the text home tomorrow. You can click them to enlarge them and notice that each sermon minor point trickles up to a major point the author is trying to make which I’ve tried to convey by using differing colors.

I am also excited because I started prepping towards Colossians a month ago and in the next few weeks we will begin a new journey, on a new book, discovering afresh the glory of our God and King.

Galatians 1 - 2, outline, chart, irving jensen, pericope, Galatians, Paul, Baptist
Galatians 1 - 2, outline, chart, irving jensen, pericope, Galatians, Paul, Baptist
Galatians 1 - 2, outline, chart, irving jensen, pericope, Galatians, Paul, Baptist

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6 thoughts on “God’s Word, God’s People, a Pastor’s Joy

    • @Mark: Thankfully the pastor-teacher is always informing (affecting) himself first, before he can others! This is the ideal anyway, and this is a nice outline/form from Galatians. Btw, this Letter/Book certainly affected Luther and also John Wesley! > As me too! (Thanks be to God!) Keep at it! :)

      • “Thankfully the pastor-teacher is always informing (affecting) himself first, before he can others!” Amen.

        I read Luther; I was much a taken by his description of the book as his Mary however I thought he punished the Law a little too severely. It was a pendulum swing too far: he vilified the Law rather than positioning it as the pedagogue or mirror it rightfully is. Does that make sense?

        I read Calvin and he thought he treated the content more fairly.

        Tomorrow I’ll credit the resources I used.

  1. begins and ends with a statement about the unusual growth of the church. Verse 42 lists four of the activities to which the church devoted itself; verses 43-47 serve to further define these four activities. We will therefore consider each of the four activities, along with Luke’s further description in verses 43-47.

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